TWITTER’S NEW FEATURE: BYE BYE RT, HELLO IP

Over the last years, Twitter has introduced quite some changes to our ways of digital communication:

  • Reduce copy to the max (=140 characters).
  • You better get familiar with #hashtags.
  • Use RT (retweet) and MT (modified tweet) right in front of a tweet you quote to promote interaction.The latter was rather tricky to use since, depending on the copy length of the original tweet, you had no more than 5-10 characters left to comment.

With the release of their latest feature, Twitter has ended the fight for ‘left-over’ characters. The original tweet is now embedded in your retweet, while you have the full 140 characters left at your disposal. At the same time, this feature kills the community’s beloved vocabulary of RTs and MTs.

This is how it looks:

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And here is our point of view:

The loss will be forgotten soon because the advantages we identified clearly outweigh nostalgic feelings in an innovative medium.

  1. You regain the power of 140 characters that you can use wisely for your content instead of squeezing anything close to what you actually want to say in the RT.
  2. The intellectual property of the original tweet’s sender is more protected. The tweet can no longer be modified, which means no more ‘accidental’ deletion of source or change of meaning.
  3. Your contribution or comment to the original tweet can easily be identified. Followers see your thoughts at first sight instead of trying to track them down in a jungle of quotation marks, squeezed-in abbreviations and RTs.
  4. Last but not least, grammar has been granted a new chance to be used properly with more space and less mandatory RT-identifiers (“”, RT, MT) to be included.

The rollout started with the iPhone app and will be available for Android and pc soon.

By |2016-02-09T11:34:53+00:00April 8th, 2015|SOCIAL MEDIA|

About the Author:

Marion is a passionate communicator and entrepreneur, with a dedication for linguistics and the latest social networks (her favorite still being Twitter). She founded WILLAM COMMUNICATIONS in 2014.